Word to Your Mother...

            My daughter, Sarah, and I left the house this morning at 8:15 to drive two hours so that she could be at a collegiate track meet in Pennsylvania.  

We arrived on-time…which gives Sarah time to start warming up before the pit opens at 11am. (That means that the girls can make practice jumps onto the mats.  Sarah is a pole vaulter.)  

Competition starts at noon.  

It is overcast and 51 degrees so I decide to stay warm in the car until closer to start time.  Trying to use my time wisely, I start writing this week’s blog.  

UGH!!! Sarah just came to tell me that she’s not sure why, but they’ve been pushed back to a 12:30pm start.  I’m sure that all of you with children in sports know how I feel right now. 

Practice has moved from Wednesday to Tuesday.  

Team pictures are Sunday at 3:15pm.  

Get to the field and find out that the other team doesn’t have enough players. 

 Even if you aren’t a parent, if you’ve participated in youth sports or any other youth activity, you understand the frustration to which I am referring. 

 In spite of the frustrations, we push through because we realize how important having these experiences is for our children.  These activities enhance their lives by well-rounding them and teaching life lessons.  

These lessons come at low risk; and, they are so important: being a good winner and loser, being part of a team, trying something new, giving your best, and just having fun. 

Parents, of course, influence their children in a variety of ways.  I have read several articles over the years about how parents’ activity levels…especially mothers’ activity levels…influence the activity levels of their children.  

Generally, active moms have children that enjoy physical activity and have a more positive attitude toward it.  

It is a source of building self esteem and relationships.  

I see this all the time in our own gym.  

The children in my classes are always looking to see what their parents are doing. And, they also love sharing their own advances and successes with Mom and Dad (or Gramma and Grampa J).  CrossFit has been a source of building relationships in my own family.

Mothers’ Day can be a difficult day for me.  

My mom passed away very suddenly and unexpectedly almost 9 years ago from a pulmonary embolism.  

She was 61 years old.  Rachel was 15; and, Sarah was almost 13 when my mom died.  Instead of being sad on Mothers’ Day, I try instead to focus on the fact that I am a mom; and, I have a wonderful husband and children and son-in-law that want to celebrate the day with me.  It was just after my mom died that I started working out with Dustin.  

I had played softball in high school, but student athletes, especially young women in the late ‘80s, didn’t train the way they do today.  We just practiced our sport.  So, like many of you, I learned about using weights and Olympic lifting “later in life.”

I know that my daughters are the physically strong and competitive athletes that they are today because I chose to start CrossFit with Dustin.    

I am always my children’s biggest fan…in the gym and in life.  

I have enjoyed competing with both of my girls.  

I have watched my girls compete together and in their own individual sports. 

I am proud of the fact that both of my girls can out-lift me.  

Many of you have heard me say that I am the “Mother of Diesel Children.”  

I take credit for introducing them to CrossFit and am grateful that we share this lifestyle and this time together.

I believe that because they were introduced to CrossFit at a formative time in their lives that now as adults they continue to value time spent working out and making healthy life choices. 

Happy Mothers’ Day to all of our CrossFit 330 Moms! Know that you are setting a wonderful example for your children by taking care of yourself and making a healthy, active family a priority.   Keep being your children’s biggest cheerleaders. 

If you haven’t already, you will someday discover that they are your biggest cheerleaders, too. 

~ Lisa

Things Rachel and Sarah Learned From their Mom and Sports/CrossFit

Those of you that know them will have to try and guess which ones belong to which child.

*Always have snacks and a water bottle.

*Life is about balance.

*Be someone’s cheerleader when they’re being their own worst critic.

*Take care of your body.

*Giving your time is much more valuable than any physical gift. (They both said that one. :)

*Even when you have a bad day in sport, you still have to be a good teammate.

*Lead by example, not words.

*Show someone that you love them by supporting them when they are doing something that they love. (They both said this one, too. :D

*Be on time. (Because it drives me nuts when Mom is late.)